Sexuality, love, masculinities: an interdisciplinary conference in Stuttgart is pointing the way ahead

Despite the bourgeoning of gender studies in recent decades, the question of masculinities has been widely neglected. Gender studies have indeed often become synonymous with women studies, exclusively. For this reason, scholars of different disciplines decided in 1999 to found AIM Gender, an international working group for interdisciplinary men studies.

The working group’s 2013 Annual Conference took place in Stuttgart in December 2013, bringing together senior as well as junior researchers from a wide range of disciplines within cultural studies and social sciences. Under the conference’s topic “Sexuality, love, masculinities” sociological and historical studies were presented, elaborating on questions of masculinities in self-help books, television, cultural artefacts, sexual science, court trials and fitness studios, spanning a time period from early modern times until today.

Furthermore, literary representations of masculinities were discussed in detail, including papers on the figures of the pick-up artist, Don Juan and Dionysus, as well as papers focusing on sexuality that deviates from accepted norms and cross-cultural studies, such as my contribution on “Sexuality, Love and Power: Negotiating Masculinities in German and Chinese Literature”.

As a truly interdisciplinary event on a timely topic, this conference therefore certainly points into the direction of a desirably more collaborative way of studying complex phenomena across disciplines.

The conference papers can now be read online.

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Kafka and the Yellow Cover: The Uses and Abuses of Colours

The very first Chinese translations of works by Franz Kafka in the early 1960s, shortly before the Cultural Revolution was launched, were wrapped in a yellow cover. They were part of Mao Zedong’s strategy of “knowing your enemy” and, as negative examples of Western decadent literature and a warning sign of the rotten capitalism, these so-called “yellow-cover books” (huangpi shu) were only disseminated among a small circle of selected readers, including high-ranking party officials and members of the Chinese Writers’ Association. Their cover was yellow in order to visually mark them as “hypocritical and treacherous spiritual poison”.

The uses and abuses of colours, like in this case, are the subject of a set of articles recently published in MALMOE – the socio-critical creative Austrian bimonthly newspaper run by the Verein zur Förderung medialer Vielfalt und Qualität (an association for the promotion of diversity and quality of media) in Vienna. After brown and pink the third part of its series Farbenlehre (colour theory) is dedicated to the colour yellow, featuring articles on a variety of topics including the “yellow badge”, the “yellow pages” and the “yellow card” as well as my article HUANG. Gelb und/in China, which can now be read online.